Stock up on these items to make the perfect, cool-weather autumn coffee!

As the weather cools, our brewers heat up and, if you are anything like me, your coffee preference shifts from light and bright to rich and creamy. Today, we are sharing our favorite tips for creating the perfect autumn coffee.

Increase mouthfeel

Mouthfeel matters. In terms of coffee, mouthfeel is that sensation of weight and density you feel as coffee hits your tongue. If you like to stick with the same coffee year-round, modifying the brew strength or method to match the season is a great way to create the sensation of a lighter or heavier mouthfeel without changing coffees. If you enjoy exploring the world of coffee, try a coffee with a lighter mouthfeel in warm months and a heavier mouthfeel in cool months. Generally, coffee lighter in mouthfeel tends to be roasted to a lighter shade, has higher acidity, and pairs best with lighter, less dense foods and pastries. Coffee with heavier mouthfeel tends to be roasted to a full city or dark roast shade, has lower acidity, and pairs best with dark, heavier, richer foods like meats and chocolate.

The QB cool-weather pick: rich full city roasts like Colombian Supremo or Campesina or Peru, Indonesians, and dark roasts.

Flavor up!

Yes, you read that right, dress up your favorite coffee with a flavorful spice or velvety drop of chocolate to add extra depth and seasonal flavor to your cup. In addition to chocolate and spices, coffee flavoring syrups, flavored milk, chocolate chunks, marshmallows, crushed biscuits, and purees (like pumpkin!) are wonderful coffee flavoring agents. In addition to enhancing the flavor and texture of your coffee, these add-ins also sweeten your cup.

The QB cool-weather pick: cinnamon, nutmeg, and vanilla for spice toppings. Caramel / butterscotch, pumpkin spice, and maple for flavoring syrups, and marshmallows and tea biscuits for ‘real food’ add-ins.

Add protein and fat

Let your coffee help fill and warm you up by adding protein or extra fat to your cup. The most common coffee add-ins are cheese, egg, and peanut butter. If that sounds a little too ambitious, bulletproof coffee (butter) is another great option. In addition to the extra protein, adding extra fat to your cup will also keep your coffee warmer longer.

The QB cool-weather pick: butter. Butter is relatively neutral in flavor, melts evenly, and adds a lovely creaminess to the cup.

Warm your cup

Coffee cools more quickly in cooler temperatures. Thankfully, there are some easy steps you can take to keep your coffee hotter longer, including warming your cup before adding your coffee, using a thermal cup / mug, wrapping your cup in a coffee cozy, and adding cream. Cream, even the lovely whipped variety, slows evaporation and heat loss in the coffee, allowing it to retain its heat longer.

The QB cool-weather pick: preheat your cup by swirling hot water around in your cup before adding your coffee. If you brew with a Pour Over or French Press, preheat the carafe before brewing.

For more cool-weather coffee tips and information, please visit the following posts:

Tips for keeping your coffee warm this winter

The best naturally spiced, soul-warming coffees to drink this winter

Winter’s hottest coffee-based cocktails

Beef stew in a coffee-red wine sauce

4 thoughts on “Stock up on these items to make the perfect, cool-weather autumn coffee!

Add yours

  1. All the ingredients sound so good, except for the marshmallows. They look good in the photo, but I would substitute with whipped cream. I hate marshmallows.

    Like

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